Tips for Better Blood Handling

Lessons you’ve taught us – and why they work!

Keeping blood cold can be a challenge. Here we present a few EASY handling procedures that can be readily incorporated into the day-to-day receiving and dispensing of blood in your blood bank – and make a significant difference.

You told us in our late 2013 survey what topics were of most interest to you and your colleagues in the blood bank. The most popular choices – by a large margin – were:

  1. Proper handling of blood products, and
  2. Use of temperature sensors in blood transport to the OR and ER/Trauma

Reflecting on the conversations and comments from visitors to our booth at the 2013 AABB in Denver, this survey validated what many of you have told us about keeping blood cold and proper handling.

In this VUEPOINT we are summarizing some of the handling procedures and ideas that blood bankers from around the world have shared with us over the years.

Tip #1

Handling blood bag by edges to prevent warming blood product Always handle blood bags by the ends where there is no blood that may be warmed by normal handling.

Why?

Holding a typical 300 – 400 cc blood bag in warm human hands for even 20-30 seconds may raise the core temperature by up to 2°C. The temperature rise is faster in smaller bags (< 350 cc) so extra care should be taken to handle small bags only by parts of the bag where no blood may be warmed by handling.

Tip #2

Always keep cold packs in the blood refrigerator. Place blood bags on a cold pack immediately when removing blood from the refrigerator – MAKE IT A HABIT!

Why?

A 350 cc blood bag that starts at 3.5 °C will reach 6.0°C in approximately 6 minutes and approximately 10°C in approximately 19 minutes depending on the temperature of its environment, and the temperature of any surface it comes into contact with (hands, lab bench, etc.).

The same bag on a cold pack, where both blood and cold pack are at 3.5°C and placed on a bench at 20°C will keep the blood below 6.0°C for approximately 14 minutes and below 10.0°C for approximately 36 minutes.

This is a no-brainer! USE COLD PACKS.

350 cc Blood Bag, temperature change with and without cold pack
3.5 °C 6.0°C 10°C
Without Cold Pack START 6 minutes 19 minutes
With Cold Pack START 14 minutes 36 minutes

Tip #3

Using an adhesive temperature indicator on the blood bag is one way to monitor – and be assured – that the blood temperature has not exceeded the upper compliance temperature of 6.0° C or 10.0°C.

Why?

Adhesive temperature indicator on blood product gives visual indication

Indicators give visual indication when the blood is approaching the 6°C or 10° C compliance temperature, and then confirm if the blood exceeded temperatures – even if the blood is “re-cooled” to a compliance temperature.

QUICK ACTIVATION TIP

Temperature indicators on blood bags in blood bank refrigerator

Some blood banks have adopted a procedure to apply the indicators to blood bags as they are put in blood bank refrigerator storage – then they can quickly activate the indicator immediately when the blood is dispensed, or activate it at the same time it is applied.

VALIDATION TIP – When validating a blood indicator be certain to use a temperature recorder that measures and indicates to within 1/10th of 1°C accuracy (0.1 °C).

 

SELECTION TIP – When choosing an indicator, be sure to pay attention to and ASK FOR proof that the product has been cleared through the 510(k) process by the FDA. This can be verified by receiving the product’s FDA 510(k) registration number from your supplier. To learn more about FDA 510(k) registration, read this VUEPOINT.

 

Do You Have Any Tips To Share?

  • Are there other procedures or ideas from your blood bank that we can share?
  • Do you have unanswered questions that we can help you get answers to?

Your peers, in hundreds of blood banks around the globe, are always eager to learn from each other. Please pass on your Tips for better blood handling, and we will be sure to post them in the next VUEPOINT.

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