Cooler Validation: Comparison of “Manual” Thermometer vs. “Automated” Data Logger Methods

In our March 2012 survey of over 70 blood banks, many respondents generally described cooler validation as a “pain,” characterizing it as time-consuming, frustrating and even primitive.

Most blood banks revalidate their transport coolers annually. And although it is only once a year, there never seems to be a good time or resource-efficient way to do it.


Using multiple data loggers allows more accurate temperature mapping of the cooler interior.

The three key factors we hear repeated most often are:
1. Time Efficiency (technician’s time)
2. Data Accuracy
3. Simplifying Documentation

At the SCABB/CBBS meeting last month, we entertained compelling discussions with blood bankers who have switched from manual cooler validations with thermometers, to using data loggers (electronic temperature recorders). Some of them are using the Val-A-SureTM Cooler Validation Kit.

If you’ve ever considered switching to an automated validation process, we thought it might be helpful to share what we’ve learned from blood bankers across the country. In the following table (next page) we compare the traditional “manual” thermometer method to the “automated” data logger method – and capture how it has changed their validation experiences.

This graph displays temperature of the top bag vs. the bottom bag. The data is downloaded from data loggers and printed for permanent validation documentation, eliminating handwritten and transcribed data.

We’ll be giving away a Val-A-Sure Cooler Validation Kit at AABB 2015, so if you’re interested in a “free” chance to change your cooler validation method, be sure to stop by and see us!

Jeffrey Gutkind
jeffg@temptimecorp.com

P.S. For more on Transport and Storage Coolers, check out our Tips, Helpful Ideas and AABB Standards References on www.williamlabs.com.

COMZ VUEPOINT – Cooler Validation-Comparison of Manual Thermometer vs. Automated Data Logger Methods – web version (doc. 2341)

Val-A-Sure Cooler Validation Kit Overview & Introduction

The Val-A-Sure™ Cooler Validation Kit from William Labs (williamlabs.com) combines everything you need in one simple kit for temperature validation of blood transport coolers. All of the necessary components, instructions and documentation for validation are conveniently included in the kit, and have been tested to work together efficiently and accurately.Hands-on trials and feedback from blood banks and laboratories provided the guidance for the Val-A-Sure™ kit development. It delivers the simplicity, accuracy, standardization and speed of process that blood banks and labs told us that they need — in one integrated kit.

Recommended SOPs, temperature recorders and software provide options for an accurate validation process, regardless of your blood bank size. Using electronic recording equipment and following the SOPs, and using the supporting documentation, helps ensure consistent measurement and recording for each validation.

The DVD and documentation supplied with the kit contain:

– QuickStart Guide
– Easy-to-follow 3 minute video instructions of 3 different recommended validation procedures
– Validation SOPs (4 included)
– Validation Log Sheet
– Cooler Label format/template
– Validation Tips

Simulating Platelets for Validations

Guidance in using an average density to simulate platelets for validations

After reading our VUEPOINT post – “Simulated Blood Products: 10% Glycerol in water may NOT be “One Size Fits All” – that presented “recipes” for simulated blood products (Red Blood Cells, Whole Blood and Plasma) – one of our VUEPOINT readers recently  posted a comment on our website. The question was about platelets, asking for the water-glycerol mixture for simulating them, just like we had done for the other blood products. Great question and we’re glad you asked!

How do we calculate an accurate mixture based on varying platelet densities?

Because of the density range of platelets, if you were striving to be highly, highly accurate, you would need to know what group the platelets fall into. Various professional papers discuss high, low and other density groups. Here is a reference from the University of Virginia School of medicine that classifies platelets into three Density Classes, with an average density for each class.

Another platelet density analysis reported “…normal platelets layered onto Percoll formed a band extending from 1.0625 g/ml to 1.0925 g/ml, with a mean platelet density of 1.0775 g/ml:…”.1

In response to our VUEPOINT reader’s inquiry, we have modified our graph and recommended water-glycerol mixture (1.066, 26%) to include a formula for platelets. This graph plots the % Glycerol (y-axis) to Density / Specific Gravity (x-axis), which reflects density, for Plasma, Whole Blood, Platelets and RBCs.

Recommended “Recipes” for simulated blood products

Based on the data presented in this VUEPOINT, we recommend that you consider using the following mixtures for blood product simulation.

Stir for a few minutes to assure a homogeneous solution. Be sure to follow any precautions supplied by the glycerol manufacturer for handling pure glycerol.

Other Sources for Platelet Density Information

For those of you who are interested in digging a little deeper into platelet density, here is a link to another reference that reports blood density determination:
Blood. 1977 Jan;49(1):71-87. Heterogeneity of human whole blood platelet subpopulations. I. Relationship between buoyant density, cell volume, and ultrastructure. Corash L, Tan H, Gralnick HR.

Please Share Your Questions and Feedback

We always appreciate questions like these that give us an opportunity to do some research and share more valuable information, with the goal of making your job a little easier if we can. Please don’t hesitate to post a COMMENT to any of our VUEPOINT articles if you have something to share, or would like to us to “dig a little deeper” for our mutual learning.
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1 Platelet-Density Analysis and Intraplatelet Granule Content in Young Insulin Dependent Diabetics, A. Collier, H.H. K Watson, D.M. Matthews, L. Strain, C.A. Ludlam, and D.F. Clarke, Diabetes, Vol. 35, October 1986.