What is “stop temperature?”

Return to Refrigerator Challenge” generates new questions from blood banks

This was the most common question we received from blood bankers in an unprecedented response to our January 2017 VUEPOINT.  In that issue of VUEPOINT, we shared the results of a “Return to Refrigerator Challenge” – where a major university hospital conducted a test to compare two blood temperature indicators.  Their intention was to evaluate indicator performance when unused blood was returned to the blood bank.

Although this was the first time we discussed stop temperature in a VUEPOINT, it’s not the first time we’ve received questions about it from our blood bank contacts. To address those issues, we researched what stop temperature means for indicator manufacturers who use this specification. We found that stop temperature appears to relate to the chemical indication behavior.  This means that if the blood product temperature is below the stop temperature, the indicator does not change color.

How does a 10oC indicator with an 8oC stop temperature behave?

The 10oC indicator used in the challenge has a specified stop temperature of 8oC.  If the blood product begins to exceed the stop temperature (8oC), the 10oC indicator’s chemical indication material melts back to its liquid state. This melting reaction gives users a visual indication that the blood product is no longer in compliance. This type of indicator may signal that the blood product is out of compliance once it exceeds 8oC, even if it never reaches 10oC, as shown in this example.

What does this mean to blood banks using a stop temperature type indicator?

Now that we understand what stop temperature is, the question is what does the specification – and indicator performance – mean to blood banks?  Specifically, what happens if the blood product is hovering around the 8oC stop temperature for any period?

Tests shared by blood banks, combined with our studies, have shown that under a wide range of exposures and times – once the indicator exceeds its stop temperature of 8oC, the indicator may be irreversibly tripped.  In multiple tests, the blood product temperature was being internally monitored to confirm that it remained below the indication temperature of 10oC before being returned to the blood bank refrigerator.  After the blood bags were returned to the refrigerator for reissue, many indicators had tripped during the refrigeration period.

Comments and questions from blood banks based on findings

  • “Doesn’t this make it an 8oC indicator?”
  • “We have many bags that are returned to the blood bank at 8oC and they look OK. We put them in the refrigerator and they show overheated.  This is an 8oC indicator.  We are throwing out good blood.”
  • “This did not show up in the standard validation, and it never occurred to us to try this while performing the validation. After performing the ‘return to refrigerator challenge’ we found that the indicator just did not perform”.

We are grateful for comments and questions like these because they help fuel our blood indicator knowledge and testing.  Clearly, the “stop temperature” specification may be new to many blood banks and is something to be further explored.  Please share your experiences and observations so we can continue learning together.

3 Things You Need to Know

About Blood Temperature Indicators

Do you trust a product to protect your blood supplies that may “auto activate?” Would you be discarding expensive blood products because of an unreliable indicator?

1. Accuracy Matters

Of the indicators on the market, one is clearly less accurate. “Indicator A” can reach endpoint at 9o, resulting in wasted blood – blood that may actually be in compliance.

2. Performance Varies Greatly

The fine print for a competing indicator clearly states that AFTER ACTIVATION, the temperature of the blood needs to be brough back down to its 8oC “Stop Temperature” to avoid premature indication.

This means that the indicator could prematurely indicate at a temperature as low as 8oC if the blood bank doesn’t take the extra step to ensure that the blood – after attaching an activated indicator – is cooled below this “stop temperature.”

3. Lower Price May Not Be Lowest Cost

Comparing indicator purchase price may make it seem like an easy choice.  however, the actual COST of an indicator that is:

  • poor performing
  • less accurate, or
  • unreliable

is dramatic in comparison to the cost of wasted blood products.

Knowing that, on average:

  • blood banks receive a significant amount of issued blood back
  • ONE unit of wasted blood may cost the blood bank $250
It only makes sense that a more reliable indicator that reaches endpoint at 9.6oC (and not as low as 8.0oC) is a more cost effective choice.

Handy Tip

Safe-T-Vue lot-by-lot QA documents are posted here on our website for easy customer access – and prove that Safe-T-Vue is manufactured to quality standards.

 

Cooler Validation: Comparison of “Manual” Thermometer vs. “Automated” Data Logger Methods

In our March 2012 survey of over 70 blood banks, many respondents generally described cooler validation as a “pain,” characterizing it as time-consuming, frustrating and even primitive.

Most blood banks revalidate their transport coolers annually. And although it is only once a year, there never seems to be a good time or resource-efficient way to do it.


Using multiple data loggers allows more accurate temperature mapping of the cooler interior.

The three key factors we hear repeated most often are:
1. Time Efficiency (technician’s time)
2. Data Accuracy
3. Simplifying Documentation

At the SCABB/CBBS meeting last month, we entertained compelling discussions with blood bankers who have switched from manual cooler validations with thermometers, to using data loggers (electronic temperature recorders). Some of them are using the Val-A-SureTM Cooler Validation Kit.

If you’ve ever considered switching to an automated validation process, we thought it might be helpful to share what we’ve learned from blood bankers across the country. In the following table (next page) we compare the traditional “manual” thermometer method to the “automated” data logger method – and capture how it has changed their validation experiences.

This graph displays temperature of the top bag vs. the bottom bag. The data is downloaded from data loggers and printed for permanent validation documentation, eliminating handwritten and transcribed data.

We’ll be giving away a Val-A-Sure Cooler Validation Kit at AABB 2015, so if you’re interested in a “free” chance to change your cooler validation method, be sure to stop by and see us!

Jeffrey Gutkind
jeffg@temptimecorp.com

P.S. For more on Transport and Storage Coolers, check out our Tips, Helpful Ideas and AABB Standards References on www.williamlabs.com.

COMZ VUEPOINT – Cooler Validation-Comparison of Manual Thermometer vs. Automated Data Logger Methods – web version (doc. 2341)

Are all temperature indicators created equal?

When it comes to cost and performance, how do you choose?

by Jeffrey Gutkind

In today’s cost-conscious healthcare environment, our immediate reaction when making a buying decision is to minimize purchase cost.   The temperature indicators currently on the market have different costs.  And there are questions you may be asking:

  • is the “cheapest” purchase price going to save the blood bank money overall?
  • are all indicators equal in terms of performance?
  • how do you know which indicator to choose?

To answer these questions, let’s take a step back and question WHY we even use temperature indicators.

Temperature indicators for blood products were originally designed to provide assurance that blood product temperatures had not exceeded AABB temperature guidelines when the blood is out of the blood bank’s control. The temperature indicator provides proof that the blood product has been maintained at proper temperature while out of the blood bank control.

Numerous visitors to our AABB booth a few weeks ago stated that 40-50% of the blood issued from their blood banks is not used. To further illustrate the challenge, a journal article recently published in Transfusion (shared in our August 2014 VUEPOINT), described a study by a blood bank that stated how most of their blood waste was from either temperature or time (away from the blood bank) excursions, and that 70% of those losses came from blood products issued to the OR in coolers.  Temperature indicators are used by blood banks worldwide for exactly this reason – to provide assurance that the blood products at no time exceeded temperature thresholds, to help maintain blood product quality and to minimize blood waste.

So, other than cost, what matters when choosing an indicator?

Let’s circle back to our initial questions of the temperature indicator cost and the temperature indicator performance.  Since the job of a temperature indicator is to provide temperature information back to the blood bank, the indicator’s temperature ACCURACY (also referred to as “tolerance”) is critical.

As an example, of the three most popular 10o C temperature indicators on the market today, each publishes a different accuracy specification:

  • Safe-T-Vue 10  +/- 0.4 o C
  • Indicator A +/- 0.5 o C
  • Indicator B +/- 1.0 o C

How does indicator accuracy influence blood product waste?

In this illustration, you can see that a 10oC indicator with an accuracy of  +/- 1.0 may actually “trip” at 9 o C, thus falsely indicating that the temperature of the blood is out of specification.  And, as we all know, the cost of wasted blood itself far exceeds the purchase price of an indicator – and minimizing blood waste (not indicator cost) is the primary objective behind using a temperature indicator.

Using an average cost of $250.00 for a single wasted blood unit, it’s easy to calculate the potential savings of using a more accurate temperature indicator.   The cost difference in temperature indicators is minimal in comparison to the cost of one wasted unit of blood.

When comparing temperature indicators to make a buying decision, be sure to make ACCURACY comparison a key factor in your selection process.  Safe-T-Vue indicators are available in 6°C and 10°C temperature indications, both accurate within +/-0.4°C.  *

As always, we welcome your comments and feedback on the ideas presented in this VUEPOINT.

Sincerely,

Jeffrey Gutkind
jeffg@temptimecorp.com

* Refer to AABB standards for blood banks and transfusion services, 21 CFR 640.2, 21 CFR 640.4, and 21 CFR 600.15.

Reduce RBC and FFP Waste, Improve ROI

Learn more from this Blood Transport and Storage Initiative that resulted in significant ROI

by Jeff Gutkind, Business Development Manager

I recently read an article in the journal Transfusion1 in reference to reducing red blood cell (RBC) and plasma (FFP) waste.  The study showed significant reduction in RBC and FFP waste by using a new blood transport and storage system, and a significant return on their investment in the new system (estimated savings of $9000/month for their institution).

While the article doesn’t speak to temperature indicators, it does seem to validate that there is a trend toward cooler storage in the OR being considered “intraoperative storage,” which is significant.

For those of us sensitive to blood waste (and associated costs) due to time-temperature issues, this study has a wealth of valuable information and powerful messages:The article cites a national waste rate for hospital-issued blood products ranging from 0% to 6%, and a common reason for blood waste being inadequate intraoperative storage.2

  • The article describes how most of their blood waste was from either temperature or time (away from the blood bank) excursions, and that 70% of those losses came from blood product issued to the OR in coolers.
  • In the second paragraph they state that “AABB standards require red blood cell and plasma units to be maintained at a temperature of 1-10°C during transport and 1-6°C during intraoperative storage.
  • They go on to state (under Materials and Methods) that “holding product in the OR represents a storage condition“….. and “the storage (1-6°C), not the more lenient transport (1-10°C) temperature range needed to be maintained.”

Their previous procedure was to issue blood products to the OR in off-the-shelf commercial coolers that were validated to hold product at 1-10°C for 8 hours. They changed to a new, more expensive cooler that incorporated specialty phase change material that is validated to hold 1-6°C for 18 hours. As a result of the new system and strategy, they have improved their “storage” compliance to 1-6°C and reduced waste from 1.20% to 0.06%, which they calculate to save the $9,000 per MONTH.

The result of this study suggests that incorporating a new, longer duration blood shipping and storage container has allowed the OR to store blood for up to 18 hours at 1-6°C while meeting AABB’s more strict guidelines and has produced significant cost savings and notable return on investment 

It would be interesting to see the savings if they incorporated a Safe-T-Vue 6 indicator in this study.

REFERENCES:

1. Brown MJ, Button LM, Badjie KS, Guyer JM, Dhanaroker SR, Brach EJ, Johnson PM, Stubbs JR. Implementation of an intraoperative blood transport and storage initiative and its effect on reducing red blood cell and plasma waste, Transfusion 2014;54: 710-07.

2. Heltimiller ES, Hill RB, Marshall CE, Parsons FJ, Berkow LC, Barrasso CA, Zink EK, Ness PM. Blood wastage reduction using Lean Sigma methodology. Transufions 2010;50: 1887-96.

Tips for Better Blood Handling

Lessons you’ve taught us – and why they work!

Keeping blood cold can be a challenge. Here we present a few EASY handling procedures that can be readily incorporated into the day-to-day receiving and dispensing of blood in your blood bank – and make a significant difference.

You told us in our late 2013 survey what topics were of most interest to you and your colleagues in the blood bank. The most popular choices – by a large margin – were:

  1. Proper handling of blood products, and
  2. Use of temperature sensors in blood transport to the OR and ER/Trauma

Reflecting on the conversations and comments from visitors to our booth at the 2013 AABB in Denver, this survey validated what many of you have told us about keeping blood cold and proper handling.

In this VUEPOINT we are summarizing some of the handling procedures and ideas that blood bankers from around the world have shared with us over the years.

Tip #1

Handling blood bag by edges to prevent warming blood product Always handle blood bags by the ends where there is no blood that may be warmed by normal handling.

Why?

Holding a typical 300 – 400 cc blood bag in warm human hands for even 20-30 seconds may raise the core temperature by up to 2°C. The temperature rise is faster in smaller bags (< 350 cc) so extra care should be taken to handle small bags only by parts of the bag where no blood may be warmed by handling.

Tip #2

Always keep cold packs in the blood refrigerator. Place blood bags on a cold pack immediately when removing blood from the refrigerator – MAKE IT A HABIT!

Why?

A 350 cc blood bag that starts at 3.5 °C will reach 6.0°C in approximately 6 minutes and approximately 10°C in approximately 19 minutes depending on the temperature of its environment, and the temperature of any surface it comes into contact with (hands, lab bench, etc.).

The same bag on a cold pack, where both blood and cold pack are at 3.5°C and placed on a bench at 20°C will keep the blood below 6.0°C for approximately 14 minutes and below 10.0°C for approximately 36 minutes.

This is a no-brainer! USE COLD PACKS.

350 cc Blood Bag, temperature change with and without cold pack
3.5 °C 6.0°C 10°C
Without Cold Pack START 6 minutes 19 minutes
With Cold Pack START 14 minutes 36 minutes

Tip #3

Using an adhesive temperature indicator on the blood bag is one way to monitor – and be assured – that the blood temperature has not exceeded the upper compliance temperature of 6.0° C or 10.0°C.

Why?

Adhesive temperature indicator on blood product gives visual indication

Indicators give visual indication when the blood is approaching the 6°C or 10° C compliance temperature, and then confirm if the blood exceeded temperatures – even if the blood is “re-cooled” to a compliance temperature.

QUICK ACTIVATION TIP

Temperature indicators on blood bags in blood bank refrigerator

Some blood banks have adopted a procedure to apply the indicators to blood bags as they are put in blood bank refrigerator storage – then they can quickly activate the indicator immediately when the blood is dispensed, or activate it at the same time it is applied.

VALIDATION TIP – When validating a blood indicator be certain to use a temperature recorder that measures and indicates to within 1/10th of 1°C accuracy (0.1 °C).

 

SELECTION TIP – When choosing an indicator, be sure to pay attention to and ASK FOR proof that the product has been cleared through the 510(k) process by the FDA. This can be verified by receiving the product’s FDA 510(k) registration number from your supplier. To learn more about FDA 510(k) registration, read this VUEPOINT.

 

Do You Have Any Tips To Share?

  • Are there other procedures or ideas from your blood bank that we can share?
  • Do you have unanswered questions that we can help you get answers to?

Your peers, in hundreds of blood banks around the globe, are always eager to learn from each other. Please pass on your Tips for better blood handling, and we will be sure to post them in the next VUEPOINT.

How can you monitor CORE blood bag temperature with adhesive temperature indicators?

With several indicators on the market, it’s increasingly confusing to know what to use – or who to trust.

There’s been a lot of “buzz” lately about measuring core temperature of blood units during temporary storage and transport.  Do the adhesive temperature indicators on the market, including Safe-T-Vue, measure core temperature?

The simple answer is NO.

Since all of the available temperature indicators are applied to the blood bag surface, they do not measure core temperature. As most of you know, there is no way to measure core temperature of a blood unit during temporary storage and transport without inserting a temperature probe into the “core” of the bag.

So, if the indicators aren’t sensing core temperature, what are they sensing?

These adhesive temperature indicators are actually measuring the surface temperature of the bag, not core temperature.  Safe-T-Vue also measures the surface temperature of the bag. However, through over 20,000 laboratory tests, we have developed direct correlations between blood bag surface temperature and core blood product temperatures.  This process allows us to formulate a consistently performing adhesive surface indicator, and assures that Safe-T-Vue indicator response is accurately correlated to actual core temperatures.

How can you trust the performance of a temperature indicator?

1. Published product specifications

Suppliers, like William Labs, publish the temperature accuracy of their products, usually in their product literature and on their websites.

Safe-T-Vue has correlated temperature indication to core blood bag temperature supported by over 20,000 test data results that quantitatively support the consistency, predictability and repeatability of its indicator performance.

2. QA Documentation

Some suppliers take the “proof” of temperature accuracy a step farther, by supplying their customers with QA documents and procedures, documenting the temperature data for that product, for each lot, to prove that testing was performed and the product performs to specification.  Safe-T-Vue is shipped with accompanying QA documents, which can also be accessed anytime from our website.

For added confidence and convenience, the validation procedures for Safe-T-Vue are published on the website, for those users who would like to perform their validations and replicate our work in their own labs.

3. FDA 510(k) and Quality Audits

As you know, the purpose of the FDA is to oversee safety.  Section 510(k) helps the FDA make sure new medical devices are safe and effective. New medical devices submitted under 510(k) rules must also be “substantially equivalent” to other similar marketed products.

This FDA regulation that applies to medical devices, including temperature indicators, is of critical importance.  It assures that the supplier of the product you are trusting to “do its job” is both safe and effective.  510(k) ensures the product is as safe and as effective as other 510(k) devices already on the market.

Just because a product is being sold into the healthcare market, do not assume it has been cleared by FDA 510(k).  Ask your supplier – and make them prove it.

Additionally, credible suppliers have a quality plan to support the process and accuracy claims of their products.  For example, actual and statistical verification of Safe-T-Vue data supports the product claims.  As part of the quality plan, this data is reviewed by the company’s QC staff and annually by external auditors.

What’s next?

We’ve been so stimulated by the recent conversation about core temperature, that we’re making plans now for comparative studies in early 2014, which we will be sharing with you.  Our new partnership with Temptime has expanded our time-temperature testing capabilities and laboratory expertise in healthcare, so look forward to these and other test results in the coming year.

As always, if you have any thoughts on core temperature measurement and adhesive temperature indicators, we always appreciate hearing from you.  Feel free to post a comment on the VUEPOINT post, or email us.

Blood Temperature Compliance at 6°C … is it safe to re-inventory?


When blood products are issued from the blood bank in a packed cooler and are later returned to the blood bank, how do you know if the blood was maintained at the compliance temperature of 6°C? In this 90 second video, you’ll see how Safe-T-Vue® 6 from William Laboratories (www.williamlabs.com) can be used throughout the transport and temporary storage process to provide easy visual indication if the blood temperature exceeds 6°C.